Premium STI2023-10-12T17:31:18+00:00

PREMIUM STI

PREMIUM STI

PermiumSTI Boxes

SimplySTI: Premium

  • Physician ordered testing

  • Genital STI detection for men and women

  • Blood-spot card (DBS) and urine collection (validated sterile and DNA-free urine cup to eliminate false positive results)

  • Free Shipping

  • Results in 24-48 hours after received at the lab

  • Molecular testing for active organism detection

  • Actionable clinical insights

  • CAP/CLIA accredited testing laboratory

  • Neisseria Gonorrhoeae (NG)
  • Chlamydia Trachomatis (CT)
  • Trichomonas Vaginalis (TV)
  • Mycoplasma Genitalium (Mgen)
  • Ureaplasma Urealyticum (UU)
  • Treponema Pallidum (Syphilis)
  • Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1)
  • Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2)
  • HIV 1 & 2
  • Hepatitis B Virus (HEP-B)
  • Hepatitis C Virus (HEP-C)
  • Monkeypox Virus (MPXV)

WHY CHOOSE
SIMPLY STI?

WHY CHOOSE
SIMPLY STI?

  • Uses the CDC-recommended nucleic acid technology for the detection of STIs.
  • Robust multiplex pathogen & serotype detection from a single patient sample.
  • Provides improved sensitivity and specificity across multiple pathogens.
  • Has the most comprehensive test menu compared to most competitors.
  • Wide selection of sample types ensures you are using the right sample for the right diagnosis.
SIMPLYTEST PEOPLE GRAPHIC
SIMPLYTEST PEOPLE GRAPHIC

Meet the Lab

FAQ’s

Frequently Asked Questions

Is the clinician required by law to report positive results to the applicable Department of Health?2023-04-24T18:47:09+00:00

Based on the state in which the patient resides, some STIs are required by law to report positive results to the Dept. of Health. If this is the case, Alimetrix will process and reports results where required by that state’s law.

What STI tests do you offer?2023-04-24T18:33:44+00:00

Currently, we offer two 9-panel STI tests: The Complete STI test which utilizes Urine as the bio-sample. The Oral STI Test utilizes saliva as the bio-sample.  (This is the first complete Saliva STI testing panel).

What are Mycoplasma Genitalium (Mg) testing and re-testing CDC Recommendations?2023-03-22T00:56:52+00:00

“Test-of-cure” follow-up testing is not recommended for Mycoplasma unless symptoms persist.

M. genitalium lacks a cell wall, and thus antibiotics targeting cell-wall biosynthesis (e.g., ß-lactams including penicillins and cephalosporins) are ineffective against this organism. Because of the high rates of macrolide resistance with treatment failures (707) and efficient selection of additional resistance, a 1-g dose of azithromycin should not be used.
Two-stage therapy approaches, ideally using resistance-guided therapy, are recommended for treatment. Resistance-guided therapy has demonstrated cure rates of >90% and should be used whenever possible (759,963); however, it requires access to macrolide-resistance testing. As part of this approach, doxycycline is provided as initial empiric therapy, which reduces the organism load and facilitates organism clearance, followed by macrolide-sensitive M. genitalium infections treated with high-dose azithromycin; macrolide-resistant infections are treated with moxifloxacin (964,965).

If M. genitalium is detected by an FDA-cleared NAAT: Doxycycline 100 mg orally 2 times/day for 7 days, followed by moxifloxacin 400 mg orally once daily for 7 days.

Although the majority of M. genitalium strains are sensitive to moxifloxacin, resistance has been reported, and adverse side effects and cost should be considered with this regimen. In settings without access to resistance testing and when moxifloxacin cannot be used, an alternative regimen can be considered, based on limited data: doxycycline 100 mg orally 2 times/day for 7 days, followed by azithromycin (1 g orally on day 1 followed by 500 mg once daily for 3 days) and a test of cure 21 days after completion of therapy (963). Because of the high prevalence of macrolide resistance and high likelihood of treatment failure, this regimen should be used only when a test of cure is possible, and no other alternatives exist. If symptomatic treatment failure or a positive test of cure occurs after this regimen, expert consultation is recommended. Data are limited regarding use of minocycline in instances of treatment failure (966).

CDC Recommended PID treatment regimens are not effective against M. genitalium. Initial empiric therapy for PID, which includes doxycycline 100 mg orally 2 times/day for 14 days, should be provided at the time of presentation for care. If M. genitalium is detected, a regimen of moxifloxacin 400 mg orally once daily for 14 days has been effective in eradicating the organism. Nevertheless, no data have been published that assess the benefits of testing women with PID for M. genitalium, and the importance of directing treatment against this organism is unknown.

What are advantages of SimplySTI testing with SimplyTest?2023-03-21T23:12:22+00:00

One advantage of the SimplyTest STI test is that it can identify the specific types of STIs that may be causing the infection. This is important because the CDC treatment recommendations for each STI are different – each type of STI in the SimplyTest panel has a different CDC recommended course of treatment.
Another advantage of the SimplyTest STI is a broad panel test that can detect most co-infections. This is important because patients that have an STI infection often have a co-infecting STI. In a study Alimetrix conducted with a local hospital ER, over 50% of patients that tested positive for Chlamydia or Neisseria gonorrhea, also had an additional co-infection on our test panel.

What are Monkeypox (Mpox) testing and re-testing CDC Recommendations?2023-03-22T00:58:14+00:00
  • “Test-of-cure” follow-up testing recommendations are not established for monkeypox.
  • Coinfection rates of monkeypox with other STIs and HIV are extremely high — approximately 40% for person’s diagnosed with monkeypox are coinfected with another STI or HIV.
  • The CDC recommends that any person diagnosed with monkeypox, also be tested for other STI infections and HIV.

Coinfection of monkeypox and HIV is common. About 40% of monkeypox patients have HIV. Any persons diagnosed with monkeypox should also be tested for HIV. Coinfection of monkeypox and other STIs is also common. Approximately 40% of monkeypox patients have been diagnosed with another STI within the preceding year. Any persons diagnosed with monkeypox should also be tested for other STI infections. (CDC)

 

What are Nisseria Gonorrhea (NG) testing and re-testing CDC Recommendations?2023-03-22T00:49:51+00:00
  • “Test-of-cure” follow-up testing is not recommended for genital and rectal infections unless symptoms persist.
  • “Test-of-cure” is recommended 7–14 days following treatment for oral gonorrhea infections.
  • Because re-infection is common, the CDC recommends that men and women diagnosed with gonorrhea be retested three months after treatment.

A test-of-cure – follow-up testing to be sure the infection was treated successfully – is not needed for genital and rectal infections; however, if a person’s symptoms continue for more than a few days after receiving treatment, he or she should return to a health care provider to be reevaluated. A test-of-cure is needed 7-14 days after treatment for people who are treated for a throat infection. Because re-infection is common, men and women with gonorrhea should be retested three months after treatment of the initial infection, regardless of whether they believe that their sex partners were successfully treated.

Gonorrhea can be cured with the right treatment. CDC recommends a single dose of 500 mg of intramuscular ceftriaxone. Alternative regimens are available when ceftriaxone cannot be used to treat urogenital or rectal gonorrhea. Although medication will stop the infection, it will not repair any permanent damage done by the disease. Antimicrobial resistance in gonorrhea is of increasing concern, and successful treatment of gonorrhea is becoming more difficult.

What are Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) testing and re-testing CDC Recommendations?2023-03-22T00:52:48+00:00
  • “Test-of-cure” follow-up testing is not recommended for Chlamydia infections unless symptoms persist.
  • Because re-infection is common, the CDC recommends that men and women diagnosed with Chlamydia be retested three months after treatment.

Repeat infection with chlamydia is common. Women whose sex partners have not been appropriately treated are at high risk for re-infection. Having multiple chlamydial infections increases a woman’s risk of serious reproductive health complications, including pelvic inflammatory disease and ectopic pregnancy. Women and men with chlamydia should be retested about three months after treatment of an initial infection, regardless of whether they believe that their sex partners were successfully treated. If a person’s symptoms continue for more than a few days after receiving treatment, he or she should return to a healthcare provider to be reevaluated.

Chlamydia can be easily cured with antibiotics. HIV-positive persons with chlamydia should receive the same treatment as those who are HIV-negative. Persons with chlamydia should abstain from sexual activity for 7 days after single dose antibiotics or until completion of a 7-day course of antibiotics, to prevent spreading the infection to partners. Although medication will stop the infection, it will not repair any permanent damage done by the disease.

What are Ureaplasma Urealyticum (UU) testing and re-testing CDC Recommendations?2023-03-22T01:00:09+00:00

“Test-of-cure” is not recommended for Ureaplasma Urealyticum infections unless symptoms persist.

Most Ureaplasma infections are without symptoms, Symptoms that may be caused by Ureaplasma include urethritis – inflammation in the urethra which can cause pain, or a burning sensation during urination and discharge.  In women Ureaplasma can be the cause of bacterial vaginosis which can cause watery discharge and unpleasant vaginal odor.  Ureaplasma infections are also associated with premature labor during pregnancy, but doctors are undecided about routine screening to detect Ureaplasma during pregnancy. (CDC)

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ACCREDITATIONS

CAP #9450297

CLIA #01D2113023